Two Waltzes (on the Mory)

The first waltz is an original by Le Bon Truc member Barbara Truex. She has a talent for writing extraordinary melodies, and this is only the latest. I imagine my harmonies aren’t exactly right to the composition, since Barb wrote it on a mountain dulcimer, which, because of its drones has all sorts of incidental (if not accidental) harmonies.

This is a fast waltz (that’s what they said it was when I played it in Alsace) that I wrote a good many years ago. I don’t actually write many tunes, but this one had legs. Although one of my goals is to show off the sound of the Mory, I seemed to slightly overdrive the mic for this recording. Maybe time to buy new equipement.

Two Waltzes from Le Bon Truc

Barb and Gary rehearsing. Steve is off to the
left, also rehearsing.

On May 29, Le Bon Truc Trio (Steve Gruverman, Barb Truex, and myself) presented a concert at the Unitarian Universalist Church in Augusta, Maine. Barb recorded the evening and it came out great! So, I’ll be posting those recordings sur le blog. Here are two waltzes, each composed by a band member.

Saturday Night in St. Andrew is a beautiful waltz composed by Barb Truex. The dulcimer is well featured, but the accordion comes in and the trio as a whole really shines.

Saturday Night in St. Andrews by Le Bon Truc

Dill Waters Run Steep is a fast waltz I wrote many years ago, but which I still find very fun to play. People who haven’t been playing it for fifteen years seem to find it intriguing. Notice that I’ve left in the false start. It goes on for quite a while as I try to get back on the rails. Finally, I bring the festivities to a halt and restart. Just a little bit “you were there” verisimilitude!

Dill Waters Run Steep by Le Bon Truc

French Dance Field Recordings (Part 1)


Part Two is here.

Melodeonist Chris Ryall spent August of 2013 at Fête Embraud (La Chavanée) and Grand Bal de l’Europe St. Gervais. He shot a lot of video. He writes:

“The collection was intended to inform some of the … shall we say, ‘different’ … versions of these dance rhythms heard in UK pub sessions. The general focus on the dancers and their movement is intentional. If your play of a melody ‘informs the feet’ … it is probably about right!”

Some of the videos are posted on Facebook (possibly requiring Flash); others are on YouTube. The first batch of videos presented here focus on French dances. Breton dances will be featured in the next post.

French Dance Videos

Basic French Waltz (played faster and smoother than English waltz)

Scottiche (note “skip”)
Another Scottiche (delightfully light – Accordzéâm)

Mazurka current “Bal” style (generally 9/8)
Another Mazurka — Accordzéâm – great accordion solo

Mazurka Morvan style “simple, straight 3/4)


Circassian Circle – same as UK – sometimes even to the same tunes!
Another Circassian Circle

Medley of Various Dances (Lucas Thebaut says this set was made up = non Trad)


Bourrées
Bourrée du Centre – Grande Bourbonnaise (the main line bourrée, 4/4 rhythm)
Bourrée d’Auvergne (fast 3/8 rhythm) Auvergne = Massif Central
Another Bourrée d’Auvergne (fast bourrée with variation – St. Gervais BIG dance!!)
Yet Another Bourrée d’Auvergne (Komred, with the great Etienne Loic on accordion, at Embraud — watch those feet!)
Bourree de Morvan (simpler, 3/8) Morvan is the hilly part of Burgundy
Fast 3/8 circle bourrée – duo Thebault are from Charantes, so “Poitou” style?

Waltz: L’Urosa Jardiniéra

Here’s a humble but wonderful waltz, found in Mally’s Bal Folk tune book (actually, I found it in the Massif Central Tune Book, pink volume). Playing it on the Baffetti almost entirely on the F row.

Waltz in Five

Here’s a waltz in 5/4 (count 1, 2, 1, 2, 3 …) for the melodeon.net theme of the month. It’s a very basic tune found on Patrick Bouffard’s Rabaterie recording. Of course, when he plays it, it’s not basic at all.

My Set List

I’m playing at the Water Street Cafe this afternoon and compiling a set list. At the same time, I’ve begun recording a CD, and putting together a set list for that. It’s interesting that the live set list is much longer than the recording set list (which is continuing to evolve). Tunes that I feel completely comfortable playing in a bustling cafe, don’t meet my standards when committed to recording — and both of those are small subsets of the large group of tunes I play in my living room. So here’s the live set list. Links, in some cases, to videos.

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